Markdown syntax for links: suggestion


#1

Hi
Am aware that the Taskpaper format is deliberately different from Markdown (which is used in folding text). However, it would be nice to have a more Markdown-like way of displaying links in Taskpaper. Consider below:

- [Amaranth Polenta with Marinara](file:///Users/thomasjreid/Dropbox/Dropbox%20scans/Amaranth%20Polenta%20with%20Marinara.pdf)

I have used the Markdown convention to make the link more readable. It would be great if the link displayed with just the words in square brackets. I suppose I could train Marked 2 to recognise taskpaper files, but that involves moving back and forth between applications.
For consideration.


#2

This is certainly on my list, but will take time. My end goal is to support basic inline formatting, ordered lists, and checkbox lists, in addition to the current unordered lists. But I also expect that will quite a ways down the road, likely in a still distant and hazy TaskPaper 4 release.


#3

What is the current syntax of links that is supported? I am trying a slash and then file name, it makes it into a link format but when I click on it nothing happens.

If the file is in the same folder it should “just work”, no?


#4

I’ve just updated the users guide with a reference section on the types of links that TaskPaper recognizes:

https://guide.taskpaper.com/reference/links/

From your description it sounds like maybe you are referencing the file with an absolute file path, when really you want to use a relative path. For a relative path start with ./ instead of just /.


#5

Thanks, I have it working.

I had saved a file from TP and in Finder it did not show an extension. So when I typed in the file name with ./ I did not sue the extension. With your note above, I dragged the file in to create the absolute link (which worked fine) and noticed that it used the extension .taskpaper. When I added that to my relative link it worked.

I would advise in your documentation that you explicitly advise people to include the extension (even though your examples all do that already

Thanks,
Rob.


#6

Maybe it is not the appropriate time for this question, but I’m wondering, what is the point adding ordered and checkbox lists to the TaskPaper format? For me, the real beauty of the TaskPaper format is its simplicity combined with exceptional readability and flexibility (and its open and cross-platform plain-text nature, of course). Currently I cannot imagine any use case for which using ordered and checkbox lists instead of tagged tasks and notes would make more sense. What was your idea about using them?


#7

This is a “future” plan, so my thinking might very well change going forward. But I think different list types would fit pretty well in to TaskPaper. For me I most often use TaskPaper for brainstorming, figuring out things by writing them up into structured lists. And when doing that I’ve often had the wish to create a nice looking numbered list. Checkboxes is a little trickier, but I think it also makes sense. Would give a place where it makes sense to draw a nice visual checkbox without taking away the current ability to create simple non-checkbox lists. Anyway, not working on this yet of course, but I still think it makes sense at this point.