A primer on using dates in TaskPaper


#21

oh, i only mean that i set up some tags (@response, @flag, @(due DATE)). i find the @response quite useful for to dos that are basically me waiting for someone to get back to me with someone by a given date. i just click on any tag (e.g. i click on @response) and i see all the outstanding things i’m waiting on.

more generally, i format my to do list as a calendar, so that i can organise by day.

Jan:
Week 1:
- Mon
- Tues
- Wed
- Thur
- Fri
- Sat
- Sun
Week 2:
- Mon
- Tues
- Wed
- Thur
- Fri
- Sat
- Sun


#22

Got it - thanks!


#23

How should I be entering things that are due today so that they show as overdue tomorrow?

context: I have been using the tag @due(today) or @today to mean something I should do today. Slowly I realized that instead it was not converting to the actual date, but was just staying on my “due today” search across multiple days.


#24

At the moment, the only way to do that is using Scripts. Something that will run at the end of the day and update your tags accordingly. The problem is if you don’t run that script every day, now you are assuming that everything is updated and you don’t have the right anything.

I think that I mentioned that before. The danger with using recurring tasks with relative dates is that once that date is passed, you miss that. There are a lot of assumptions being made by the computer. Honestly, the best practice should be to just use ISO dates with the date selector that Jesse implemented. It is easy, and you don’t miss anything important that way!


#25

I haven’t read this discussion in detail, so I might be off here… but please make sure to take a look at:

It shows the default (no script) way of handling due dates in TaskPaper.

The general solution is:

  1. In the end to make use of TaskPaper’s built in support you should store dates in your document using ISO 8601 format. For example @due(today) should instead be @due(2018-01-09).

  2. Of course ISO 8601 formatted dates can be a pain to enter. Instead use the date palette to insert dates… there you can choose a date on a calendar widget, or type relative dates such as “today” or “next mon” and the correction ISO 8601 formatted date is inserted.

  3. Use saved searches to find due and overdue items. Saved searches can have relative date terms such as “today”, so you can use a single “due today” saved search and you won’t have to keep updating it every day.

More screencasts and info are in the user guide:

https://guide.taskpaper.com/screencasts/


#26

Thanks Jesse - I think I somewhere go the idea that @due(today) would convert automatically to today which doesn’t seem to be the case unless I script it (did I get that write?)


#27

That’s correct with the following exceptions:

  1. When you include relative dates (such as “today”) in searches they are converted to absolute dates when the search is evaluated.

  2. When you insert a date using the date pallet you can enter the date using relative dates, but when the pallet is completed then the date is converted to an absolute date and inserted into your document.

Generally if you want “@due(today)” you should use the menu Tag > Tag With … > Due and then you’ll automatically be presented with the date pallet… allowing you to enter “today”, but have a correct absolute date inserted into your document.