Curious: What is your overall setup like?


#1

I’ve seen the typical:

Project:

  • Task
  • Task
  • Task

And I’ve seen next actions unattached from projects:

Next Actions:

  • Task
  • Task
  • Task

Projects:

  • Project
  • Project
  • Project

And then there’s every other blend of using multiple documents, tags as context, and all of that.

How are you setting it up?


#2

Personally I always just do the first version, project and then tasks.


#3

what about putting @done on the project? i’ve always just deleted the line after it’s tasks are done.


#4

I think it depends on the tasks. If it’s a stand alone task like “order shoes for Christmas present”, then I do the same thing and just delete when I’m done.

But if it’s a group of related tasks (like steps to complete some larger goal) then I will often mark them as @done as I go, and then just delete them all once the larger goal is done. This helps to keep some context relate to the larger goal. What’s been done so far and what still needs to be done.

I don’t personally use archive often.


#5

i was kind of wondering about this:

Project: @done <----- using @done on the project line and then archiving

  • task1 @done
  • task2 @done
  • task3 @done

in the end that’s the great thing about TP, whatever works. I was curious if someone did do the above and what benefit it does for them. After those subtasks are done, i’ll archive them and delete the project line.


#6

I decided to keep it pretty simple and keep separate files for a Projects list and separate Next Actions lists “Computer:”, “Office:”, “Errands:”. Stripping all but the essentials has helped simplify my weekly review. I also have Reference lists like “Checklists:”, “Books to read:” I put these in a folder on Dropbox. My mostly commonly used lists are usually open and tucked in a corner in my desktop; others are quickly accessed from a Dock shortcut. The lists are intended to be very simple reminders. If I want to break down a more complex project with lots of notes I can easily do that in a new file.